About Deep Water, a TED ebook

Rivers of defrosting ice are flowing off polar glaciers and surging into the sea. As the flow becomes a deluge, the livelihoods—and very lives—of tens of millions of people living near coastlines will soon be in jeopardy.

Dan Grossman, veteran science journalist and regular contributor to public radio, and National Geographic blogger, joined a colorful team of climate researchers in the Australian outback studying how high and how quickly the oceans might rise.

In Deep Water, Dan brings us along on this quirky crew's adventures, while at the same time filling us in on the intriguing science of sea-level research. We witness discoveries of physical evidence and learn about the theories leading scientists to believe we must drastically reduce the tonnage of carbon dioxide we spew into the air.

Deep Water makes innovative use of the new TED book-app, with videos, charts, photos and audio asides throughout the text, to bring us a multimedia adventure about the urgent research, and clarifying the puzzles of Earth's polar meltdown. Follow the Australian journey on an interactive map. View videos and computer animations about the science. Listen to an iceberg crack off a glacier. Great for the scientifically curious, and for environmental course reading lists.

Buy the Deep Water app for $2.99 and load it in minutes onto your iPad, iPhone or iPod. You can also download the text (without multimedia features) for Android devices, including the Nook, Kindle and Android phones.

Deep Water cover

Critical Acclaim

"Sea level rise is one of the great unanswered puzzles of our overheated futures. Here's a fine account of some of the people trying to solve that puzzle, piece by scary piece."

— Bill McKibben

"For those new to the whole idea of serious science e-books … Grossman's is a great way to get your feet wet. And your imagination and curiosity both stoked and satisfied."

—Bud Ward, The Yale Forum on
Climate Change & the Media

"... science journalism at its best, informative, accessible, and yes, entertaining."

—Bryan Walker, Hot Topic

"As for the 'experience,' it is engaging. The book app is filled with photos, bios of researchers, maps of ice sheets, graphs of temperature cycles, animated and narrated graphics, audio files of glaciers calving, and a few videos, all of which pop up in inset windows and all of which are well done."

—Mark Fischetti, Scientific American